Taylor Wizner

Heath care and tourism reporter

Taylor Wizner is the health care and tourism reporter for IPR News. She joined IPR in 2019 after reporting at WDET in Detroit and graduating from Columbia Journalism School. When not sharing the news of the day, she enjoys being outdoors with her dog and listening to podcasts.

Interlochen Public Radio

  

Grand Traverse County reports there are two residents with COVID-19 who likely became exposed in the community.

One woman in her 70s had not travelled or had contact with any known person with the disease, a county health department investigation found. She is currently in the hospital.

The county anticipated it would see community transmission eventually, Grand Traverse County Health Department Medical Director Michael Collins said in a release.

Noelle Riley / Interlochen Public Radio

Health officials are worried about people traveling up north from downstate and other areas around the country to their second homes. 

Many are coming to northern Michigan to hunker down as the COVID-19 disease spreads in cities throughout the United States.

Health officials say they could be bringing the disease with them.

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

 

State-confirmed presumptive positive COVID-19 cases in northern Michigan:

Last updated March 30, 2020 at 2 p.m.

Noelle Riley / Interlochen Public Radio

 

The Grand Traverse County Health Department says a symptomatic person who later tested positive for COVID-19 may have spread the disease in the community last week.

The sick person was on a Delta flight from Detroit Metro Airport that arrived in Traverse City at about 5 p.m. last Monday. The health department says people who were on that flight should self-quarantine until next Monday.

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

 

On Monday, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer signed an executive order mandating people stay in their homes.

People who work in hospitals, pharmacies and grocery stores and who provide other essential services are excempt.

 

To help exempt workers do their jobs, Whitmer asked northern Michigan educators to coordinate child care services and make emergency daycare centers available if needed.

 

Kaye LaFond

 

The Grand Traverse County Health Department repored its first positive case of COVID-19 on Sunday.

The resident is a man in his 20s who has a history of international travel. He is recovering at his home. 

The Health Department says its working to identify and contact anyone the man potentially exposed. 

CDC

The state announced today another 225 presumptive positive cases of COVID-19, bringing the total number of positive cases in Michigan to 549.

Three deaths caused by the disease happened in Wayne County.

The number of positive results has gone up because commercial and clinical labs have begun testing.

The state health department is currently receiving results from two commercial labs and three clinics as well as the state lab in Lansing.

 

 

 

Kaye LaFond / Interlochen Public Radio

Senior services in northern Michigan are expanding offerings to older residents during the coronavirus pandemic.

According to census data, there are about 3,000 seniors living in Kalkaska County, many of whom  live at home alone. 

Home meal deliveries, daily check-ins, arranging to pick up a few pantry items, are all happening with frequency at local senior centers.

CDC

Two people in northern Michigan have tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

One was tested at Munson Medical Center in Traverse City and the other was tested at Otsego Memorial Hospital in Gaylord, according to Munson Healthcare.

Noelle Riley

Northern Michigan local health departments are asking residents who recently traveled to Colorado, or were passengers on a cruise ship, to distance themselves from others. 

Center for Disease Control and Prevention

 

Over the weekend, Grand Traverse County officials released guidelines for residents to stop the community spread of coronavirus. 

Administrators say there are no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Grand Traverse County, as of noon Sunday.

 

Munson Medical Center

 

 

Munson Healthcare is blocking visitors to its long-term care facilities and dialysis centers to protect vulnerable patients from COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus.

 

McLaren Northern Michigan is also limiting one visitor per patient, unless the visitor appears ill or is under 18.

CDC

Two people have tested positive for COVID-19 in the state.

In northern Michigan, tests are available but require a lengthy process. Swabs containing potential samples of the virus have to be driven downstate to the state lab.

 

 


MPRN

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer confirmed two people in Michigan tested positive for coronavirus and has declared a state of emergency.

 

Whitmer announced the development during a press conference late Tuesday night in Lansing. 

 

Bay Mills News Facebook Page

Update 03/13/2020: Two employees of Bay Mills Indian Community have been cleared of coronavirus (the person they were exposed to has tested negative).

A northern Michigan tribe is stopping Boys & Girls Club activities while it waits to find out if two employees contracted novel coronavirus. 

Bay Mills Indian Community is located in Chippewa County, about 15 miles southwest of Sault Ste. Marie.

Islam Elsedoudi for opensource.com / Flickr

 

In a January Gallup poll, voters ranked health care the top issue for the upcoming U.S. presidential election.

As Michigan votes in its presidential primaries next Tuesday, March 10, northern Michigan health care workers say local health care challenges are similar all over the country.

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

Immigration Customs Enforcement will get help from a northern Michigan county jail to hold and transport immigrants.

STEVEN DEPOLO/FLICKR - HTTPS://WWW.FLICKR.COM/PHOTOS/STEVENDEPOLO/5233546650

 

Nestlé Waters will not get the water pumping building it wants in northern Michigan. 

The company did not appeal a court decision in December, effectively stopping the bottler from being able to build on land it wasn’t zoned for.  

Max Johnston / Interlochen Public Radio

Work to reduce opioid-related deaths is beginning across the state, as part of a $10 million investment to fight the opioid epidemic.

 

Michigan ranks in the top 15 for drug overdose deaths, according to 2018 figures from the Center for Disease Control.

 

Director of Drug Use Initiatives at Vital Strategies Daliah Heller says not enough communities have access to naloxone, a life-saving drug that can reverse an opioid overdose. 

Jed Jaworski

Large waves and Lake Michigan’s record high water level are breaking down the barrier that protects the historic Point Betsie Lighthouse in Frankfort.

Key parts of the structure are fractured and falling apart.

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

 

A non-profit that helps victims of child sex abuse is trying something new.

They’re sending surveys to northwest lower Michigan households, asking people questions about child safety.

The group says with that knowledge, they’ll be better equipped to stop sexual abuse.

Kaye LaFond / Interlochen Public Radio

 

If you’re upset about drunken crowds on northern Michigan rivers in the summer, don’t expect change anytime soon.

This week, the U.S. Forest Service said it will not prohibit alcohol on the Au Sable, Pine and Manistee rivers this year. 

And at a forum about the Boardman River Wednesday, a Michigan DNR officer said they can’t arrest people for being drunk and disorderly on the water.

Giving up on an alcohol ban

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

 

Huron-Manistee National Forests officials say they won’t do an alcohol ban on several northern Michigan rivers this year.

Instead, the Forest Service will continue an education program that was implemented last year.

In February last year, the U.S. Forest Service tried to ban alcohol on the Au Sable, Manistee and Pine Rivers — which are federally protected waters. The agency wanted to better control dangerous, drunken behavior that was impacting the river experience.

Dan Wanschura / Interlochen Public Radio

 

Lake Michigan’s water level is expected to reach a new record high for January, according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

The lake hasn’t been this high since 1986.

Taylor Wizner / Interlochen Public Radio

 

Each year thousands of people enter a lottery to hunt elk in northern Michigan, but only 200 people win tags.

To ensure success, most hunters hire a guide. Increasingly, elk guides are breaking hunting laws, so hunters are guaranteed a shot. Some guides are now worried the rule breakers are damaging the sport’s reputation.

At the elk park in Gaylord, guide Preston Casselman watches elk chew cud and relax.

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