National Park Service

NPS/JACOB W. FRANK

A wolf that was part of a plan to repopulate Isle Royale National Park died last week. The wolf died in a holding facility during the transportation process.

New wolves are being introduced to the island as part of a long-term plan to balance the island’s ecosystem. Moose populations on the island have been on the rise as the wolf population has dwindled to just two, and moose are overbrowsing the island. Park officials plan to introduce 20 to 30 wolves in the next few years to help keep the moose population in check.

USFWS/Courtney Celley

A male and female gray wolf were released in Isle Royale National Park Wednesday. The wolves came from two different packs in Minnesota. They were captured at the Grand Portage Indian Reservation and then transported by plane to Isle Royale in Lake Superior. 

“One of the wolves – the female wolf – stayed in the crate for about 45 minutes before she decided to head out and check out the island,” says Liz Valencia, public information officer for the park.

Valencia says the male wolf didn’t leave his crate till after dark.

Michigan Tech University

The National Park Service is one step closer to reintroducing wolves to Isle Royale National Park. The park in Lake Superior would get 20 to 30 new wolves in the next three years.

Isle Royale once had around 50 wolves. But Park Superintendent Phyllis Green says fewer new wolves have made it to the island in recent years because Lake Superior is freezing over less. She attributes that to the warming climate. As a result, there’s been inbreeding and disease in the wolf population.

Michigan Tech University

A wildlife researcher suspects Isle Royale National Park may be down to just one wolf. The island used to have a pack of significant population of grey timber wolves, but the population has dwindled to just two in recent years in part because of inbreeding.

National Park Service

The National Park Service is scrapping plans to lease out the historic Sleeping Bear Inn in Glen Haven. The two-story inn was built in 1857 and has not been unoccupied since the 1970's.

Morgan Springer

I’m staying at D. H. Day Campground in Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore with family. My uncle, aunt and three cousins are visiting from New York. It’s a perfect evening – in my opinion –  at Site 15. Somewhat cool; sweaters and socks weather. The sky is flecked with stars, and the peepers are out. We sit around around the fire roasting marshmallows for the classic camping dessert: s'mores. 

Charles Dawley

Communities near the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore are doing their best to deal with a surge of tourists.

Attendance at the park has been rising for five years. Last year, the number of visitors jumped by 37 percent - to more than 720,000 people. That’s caused issues with parking, and a lack of restrooms and hotel rooms.

Munising Mayor Rod DesJardins says the popularity of the park is changing his town.

“We used to be somewhat of a sleepy, backwater town with a modest summer tourist economy," says DesJardins. "Now we are a premier destination in the Midwest.”

Aaron Selbig

A popular hiking trail near Glen Arbor is set to reopen this weekend. 

The Alligator Hill trail was wiped out by a powerful windstorm that hit northern Michigan last August. Crews with the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore have removed hundreds of trees and restored the trail in its original location.

The park's deputy superintendent, Tom Ulrich, says there are no plans to remove the rest of the fallen trees on Alligator Hill.

The National Park Service is taking a closer look at whether or not to bring more grey wolves to Isle Royale National Park. Only two wolves remain on the island now.

To help make its decision, the park service wants to hear from you. It’s accepting public comments on the question right now.

Aaron Selbig

Soon it will cost more to go to Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. In January the entrance fee will go from $10 to $15, and the annual entrance pass will increase from $20 to $30. Camping fees will also increase. 

Merrith Baughman, ​park ranger and chief of interpretation and visitor services, says the National Park Service wants more consistent fees across the country.