Stateside

Monday-Thursday, 3pm on IPR News
  • Hosted by Cynthia Canty

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. The show is a production of our partner Michigan Radio. It focuses on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

 

If you just focus on the craft brews and the wines made in Michigan, then you're missing a growing part of the Michigan beverage scene  cider.

Cider Week GR is happening now to May 19 in Grand Rapids. The city is also hosting the annual Great Lakes Cider and Perry Competition – the largest competition of its kind in the world, says Paul Vander Heide.

This Friday marks the 172nd anniversary of a uniquely Michigan milestone. On May 18, 1846, Michigan became the first English-speaking government in the world to vote and pass a measure to abolish the death penalty.

Mark Harvey, State Archivist with the Michigan History Center, joined Stateside to talk about Michigan’s progressive past. Judge Avern Cohn, the Senior United States District Judge for the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan, also joined the conversation.

Michigan born-and-raised actors may wind up working in New York or Hollywood, but they make sure the world knows they’re from the mitten.

Toni Trucks has been in a host of movies and TV shows, including her current roles as Lisa Davis in “SEAL Team” on CBS. Trucks began her performing career here in Manistee, and now she’s giving back to her hometown by loaning it her voice.

The U.S. Senate is taking up net neutrality today. A bill that would protect net neutrality rules from repeal by the Federal Communications Commission passed a procedural hurdle earlier this afternoon.

These Obama-era rules prevented internet service providers like Verizon and Comcast, for example, from speeding up or slowing down traffic from certain apps and websites. Barring changes made by Congress and signed by the President, the FCC's repeal of these rules is set to go into effect on June 11.

Howell High School's Jason Schrock is Michigan's Principal of the Year for 2018.

In 2000, Schrock joined Howell High School as a math teacher. After seven years, he became assistant principal, and for the last six years has been full on principal.

Leading by example and wanting to create a positive school climate he says, "The more I’ve read and learned and watched other leaders from across the state, in and out of education, I know that the direction and the culture of the organization -- the tone is set by the leader." 

The holy month of Ramadan begins this evening. For the next month, Muslims around the world will fast from sunrise to sunset and devote more time to reading the Holy Koran.

Samar Baydoun Bazzi of Dearborn wanted to make the holy month a little festive for her family. After years of seeing Christmas trees and other holiday decorations, she came up with a Ramadan tree. She joined Stateside to talk about how she came up with the idea and its reception by her family and local community.

President Trump's steel and aluminum tariffs continue to worry Michigan companies, particularly companies whose supply chains stretch to China.

One such company is Auburn Hills-based auto supplier, Lucerne International.

We often ask listeners to reach out with stories we could share on Stateside. Here's an example of when someone did just that, writing to tell us about a Detroit-based nonprofit that can save lives.

It's called Team fEMR, a free and open source electronic medical records system for short-term medical service trips. It allows medical volunteers to record and pass along patient records to the next group of volunteers.

It’s time for another edition of Theater TalkDavid Kiley, editor-in-chief of Encore Michigan, joined Stateside to preview and review plays, with a special focus on West Michigan.

If certain health providers and legislators get their way, Michigan's mental health system could soon be privatized.

Pretty much everyone agrees that closer coordination of mental and physical health care would be a good thing for patients.

After all, the mind is connected to the body, but just how to get there has been up for fierce debate going on two years now.

 

Today is the 20th anniversary of Frank Sinatra's death, but he lives on in Bob Anderson​. Anderson has been a fixture in Vegas and on stages all around the country with his show, "Frank. The Man. The Music."

 

 

The Detroit Public Theatre is wrapping up its third season with a new play that it commissioned: "Birthday Candles." It's written by Noah Haidle, a Grand Rapids native. 


 

New Lions head coach Matt Patricia has found himself at the center of a Detroit News story that reported: he'd been arrested in March 1996 and indicted for aggravated sexual assault. 

The case collapsed when the accuser decided not to testify.

The EPA has handed down a clear message to Michigan: your air is not clear. The agency says too many people are living in areas with unacceptable smog levels, and it is giving the state three years to come up with a plan to clean up the air.

For decades, January in Southeast Michigan has meant it's time for the auto show.  

Thousands trek to Cobo Center for the North American International Auto Show, often picking their way through snow and ice, but it seems that the snow may give way to autumn leaves. 

You may know M-43 as the state road that runs through Williamston and on past Lansing, aka Grand River. But more and more beer lovers are recognizing M-43 as their favorite brew.

This New England-style India pale ale has made a world of difference for Old Nation Brewing Company, based in Williamston.

The Michigan Legislature is considering a bill that would allow both zoos and other facilities to breed large carnivores, such as lions, tigers, and bears.

Such breeding was outlawed in 2000. But House Bill 5778 would lift that ban.

When do you know the time has come to seek mental health care? Then, where do you go? To whom do you turn?

It's a critical question in the quest for mental health and wellness, and we don't tend to think about it until there's a crisis.


   

Last week, the Board of State Canvassers approved a ballot petition that might end the prohibition of recreational marijuana in Michigan

 

Meanwhile, this week marked the 100th anniversary of another important social experiment: Prohibition. 

 

She may be busy with her double major in Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Physics, but Kettering University student Ruth Willet always finds time for her passion: amateur radio – also known as "ham radio." 

Siwatu-Salama Ra is a young Detroit activist who was sentenced to two years in prison for brandishing a licensed and unloaded firearm in what she claims was an act of self-defense. Her conviction has raised questions about the nature of black gun ownership in the United States.

How can Michigan attract and retain new talent? That's a question we've been hearing from Governor Snyder's office and executive suites on down for years.

Earlier this month, a General Motors executive told a roomful of automotive engineers that the autonomous vehicle revolution will bypass Detroit unless the region addresses its talent deficit.

More than 1,000 people marched through the streets of downtown Grand Rapids Tuesday in support of immigrants and protesting deportations.

Andy Johnston is the VP of government and corporate affairs for the Grand Rapids Chamber of Commerce. He joined Stateside to explain how immigrants play a crucial role in the Grand Rapids economy.

Detroit's back in control of its finances: it's out of oversight.

It's a big moment for a city that only three years ago exited the biggest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history.

Detroit Free Press columnist Rochelle Riley joined Stateside today to explain what exactly being out of oversight means for Detroit and its people.

With the weather warming up and the sun chasing away memories of the long stretch of cold, icy weather that lasted well into April, many Michigan communities are ramping up for tourist season.

That season is the economic lifeblood of many areas in Michigan, like Ludington, for instance.

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