Morning Edition

Monday-Friday, 5am-9am on Classical IPR
  • Hosted by David Cassleman, Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep
  • Local Host David Cassleman

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition. Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens. Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

A top-ranking Republican in Michigan’s House will be issued a civil infraction for bringing an unregistered gun to the airport in July.

Representative Lee Chatfield (R-Levering) was stopped in the security line at Pellston Regional Airport when he brought the gun there in July. He apologized, saying he made an "inexcusable mistake" when he accidentally brought the gun to the aiport. He also said he had thought his gun was registered.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For more than 15 years, Oakland's police department has been under federal oversight following a police abuse and racial profiling scandal.

As part of a negotiated settlement in 2003, the city agreed to work toward sweeping police reforms. The Riders Settlement mandated ongoing monitoring of the department, including the collection of data on police stops and an end to discriminatory policing.

But there's mounting frustration that federal oversight and better data collection have not led to real change, despite a massive price tag.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The History Of The Congressional Recess

Aug 8, 2018

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Before the Congress takes a break from its legislative work, there is this ritual that must be performed by the person occupying the speaker's chair.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Missouri Voters Reject Right-To-Work Law

Aug 8, 2018

Copyright 2018 St. Louis Public Radio. To see more, visit St. Louis Public Radio.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The 'Brady Bunch' House Coming To HGTV

Aug 8, 2018

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin.

(SOUNDBITE OF "THE BRADY BUNCH" THEME SONG)

UNIDENTIFIED SINGER: (Singing) Here's the story of a lovely lady...

Copyright 2018 WOSU 89.7 NPR News. To see more, visit WOSU 89.7 NPR News.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

UNOFFICIAL ELECTION RESULTS: Updated 8/8/18 10:30 a.m:

Governor: 

Republican: Bill Schuette

Democrat: Gretchen Whitmer

Libertarian: Bill Gelineau

Morgan Springer

Residents will continue funding improvements in Traverse City schools. Voters passed a $107 million bond for Traverse City Area Public Schools. According to unofficial election results, 67 percent (15,679 residents) voted yes, while 33 percent (7,662) said no.

The money will go towards things like building reconstruction, safety and technology improvements and bus replacements. 

“I mean you have to educate your kids or you’re going to be nowhere," says Kathleen Ziege who lives in Interlochen and voted for the bond.

Matt Morgan (D-Traverse City) is running for northern Michigan's seat in Congress.
Aaron Selbig

A Traverse City Democrat is confident he’ll appear on the November ballot for northern Michigan’s seat in U.S. Congress. 

Matt Morgan failed to get on the primary ballot for the 1st Congressional District because of an error on the forms he used to gather signatures. Most of the forms listed the campaign’s post office box instead of a street address. State election officials decided to keep Morgan’s name off the primary ballot.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Country star Keith Urban was trying to buy food at a gas station, but...

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WHO WOULDN'T WANNA BE ME")

KEITH URBAN: (Singing) I got no money in my pockets.

GREENE: Why not, Keith?

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NOEL KING, HOST:

A top-ranking Republican in the Michigan House will not face criminal charges after bringing an unregistered gun to the airport. Rep. Lee Chatfield (R-Levering) says he accidentally brought the firearm to the Pellston Regional Airport in July.

“Mr. Chatfield entered the Pellston Regional Airport with a firearm and everybody realizes this is a dangerous situation," says Emmet County Prosecutor James Linderman.

But Linderman says he cannot charge Chatfield under current law. 

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Updated at 4:12 p.m. ET

Germany enjoys a reputation as a pioneer of clean energy. Its leader Angela Merkel was even dubbed the "climate chancellor" when she decided to ditch nuclear power in 2011. But the reality is much dirtier.

Centuries-old villages across the country are being bulldozed to make way to mine brown coal — one of the filthiest and cheapest fossil fuels. As the world's biggest brown coal miner, Germany is at risk of missing its 2020 carbon emissions targets.

Pages